Saturday, 13 October 2012

THE PEGASUS AND ORNE BRIDGES; THEIR CAPTURE, DEFENCE AND RELIEF ON D-DAY – Neil Barber, 2009

A year ago I was in Normandy, visiting Pegasus Bridge and the other notable D-Day landing sites. I prepared myself to be emotional as I would be seeing where my Grandad had played his small but significant part during World War II. It was emotional, even though it was (and is) just a small, oddly-shaped metal structure built to allow vehicles to cross the Caen Canal. The museum housed the wreckage of one of the original gliders. This book tells how the men who flew in those gliders were trained; how they landed and fought and became a part of history.
There are many books on this subject, and this particular part of the war. This one relies to a large extent on the testimony of the combatants. Such first-hand accounts are moving and have an important part to play in building an overall picture of the experience, but much of this was collected years after the event and there is not enough independent research. It is, however, still a valuable and enjoyable addition to my ever-growing Normandy library.

1 comment:

  1. Dear Zelda,
    It's very important for me to know more about your grandad. I research information about the 249th Field Company Royal Engineers who landed in Normandy, http://ww2talk.com/forums/topic/58276-249th-field-company-re-on-d-day-and-battle-of-normandy/. If you have any more information about him, please send me an email at this adress : xpradelles@gmail.com.
    Cordialy,
    Xavier PRADELLES

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